A separate code on transfer pricing under Sections 92 to 92F of the Indian Income Tax Act, 1961 (the Act) covers intra-group cross-border transactions which is applicable from 1 April 2001 and specified domestic transactions which is applicable from 1 April 2012. Since the introduction of the code, transfer pricing has become the most important international tax issue affecting multinational enterprises operating in India.

The regulations are broadly based on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Guidelines and describe the various transfer pricing methods, impose extensive annual transfer pricing documentation requirements, and contain harsh penal provisions for noncompliance.

Statutory rules and regulations

The Indian Transfer Pricing Code prescribes that income arising from international transactions or specified domestic transactions between associated enterprises should be computed having regard to the arm’s-length price. It has been clarified that any allowance for an expenditure or interest or allocation of any cost or expense arising from an international transaction or specified domestic transaction also shall be determined having regard to the arm’s-length price. The Act defines the terms ‘international transactions’, ‘specified domestic transactions’, ‘associated enterprises’ and ‘arm’s-length price’.

Type of transactions covered

Section 92B of the Act defines the term ‘international transaction’ to mean a transaction between two (or more) associated enterprises involving the sale, purchase or lease of tangible or intangible property; provision of services; cost-sharing arrangements; lending/borrowing of money; or any other transaction having a bearing on the profits, income, losses or assets of such enterprises. The associated enterprises could be either two non-residents or a resident and a non-resident; furthermore, a permanent establishment (PE) of a foreign enterprise also qualifies as an associated enterprise. Accordingly, transactions between a foreign enterprise and its Indian PE are within the ambit of the code.

An explanation having an inclusive list of transactions has been inserted in the definition of ‘international transaction’ by the Finance Act 2012, to specifically cover certain transactions/ arrangements such as purchase, sale, transfer, lease or use of intangible property, provision of guarantees, deferred payments or receivables, business restructuring or reorganisation etc. Intangible property has been explained to include marketing intangible, customer-related intangible, human capital intangible, location-related intangible, etc. These clarifications have been inserted retrospectively with effect from 1 April 2001.

Until financial year (FY) 2011-12, transfer pricing regulations were not applicable to domestic transactions. However, the Finance Act 2012 has extended the application of transfer pricing regulations to ‘specified domestic transactions’, being the following transactions with certain related domestic parties, if the aggregate value of such transactions exceeds INR 5 crore:

  • Any expenditure with respect to which deduction is claimed while computing profits and gains of business or profession.
  • Any transaction related to businesses eligible for profit-linked tax incentives, for example, infrastructure facilities (Section 80-IA) and SEZ units (section 10AA).
  • Any other transactions as may be specified. This amendment will be applicable for FY 2012-13 and subsequent years.The relationship of associated enterprises (AEs) is defined by Section 92A of the Act to cover direct/ indirect participation in the management, control or capital of an enterprise by another enterprise. It also covers situations in which the same person (directly or indirectly) participates in the management, control or capital of both the enterprises.
  • For the purposes of the above definition, certain specific parameters have been laid down based on which two enterprises would be deemed as AEs. These parameters include:

Associated enterprises

  • Direct/indirect holding of 26% or more voting power in an enterprise by the other enterprise or in both the enterprises by the same person.
  • Advancement of a loan, by an enterprise, that constitutes 51% or more of the total book value of the assets of the borrowing enterprise.
  • Guarantee by an enterprise for 10% or more of total borrowings of the other enterprise.
  • Appointment by an enterprise of more than 50% of the board of directors or one or more executive directors of the other enterprise or the appointment of specified directorships of both enterprises by the same person.
  • Complete dependence of an enterprise (in carrying on its business) on the intellectual property licensed to it by the other enterprise.
  • Substantial purchase of raw material/sale of manufactured goods by an enterprise from/to the other enterprise at prices and conditions influenced by the latter.
  • The existence of any prescribed relationship of mutual interest.

The arm’s-length principle and pricing methodologies

  • The term ‘arm’s-length price’ is defined by Section 92F of the Act to mean a price that is applied or is proposed to be applied to transactions between persons other than AEs in uncontrolled conditions. The following methods have been prescribed by Section 92C of the Act for the determination of the arm’s-length price:
  • Furthermore, in certain cases, a transaction between an enterprise and a third party may be deemed to be a transaction between AEs if there exists a prior agreement in relation to such transaction between the third party and an AE or if the terms of such transaction are determined in substance between the third party and an AE. Accordingly, this rule aims to counter any move by taxpayers to avoid the transfer pricing regulations by interposing third parties between group entities. Also, as per Section 94A of the Act, if a taxpayer enters into a transaction in which one party is a person located in a notified jurisdictional area, then all the parties to the transaction shall be deemed to be AEs, and any transaction with such party(ies) shall be deemed to be an international transaction. This regulation aims to specify countries or territories outside India having lack of effective exchange of information as notified jurisdictional areas. To date no jurisdiction has been notified.
    • Comparable uncontrolled price (CUP) method.
    • Resale price method (RPM).
    • Cost plus method (CPM).
    • Profit split method (PSM).
    • Transactional net margin method (TNMM).
    • Such other methods as may be prescribed.It is mandatory for all taxpayers, without exception, to obtain an independent accountant’s report in respect of all international transactions between associated enterprises or specified domestic transactions. The report has to be furnished by the due date of the tax return filing (i.e. on or before 30 November). The form of the report has been prescribed. The report requires the accountant to give an opinion on the proper maintenance of prescribed documents and information by the taxpayer. Furthermore, the accountant is required to certify the correctness of an extensive list of prescribed particulars.
  • In this context, it is important to note that entities enjoying a tax holiday in India still need to comply with transfer pricing provisions and would need to demonstrate that their international transactions have been carried out at arm’s length. In addition, such entities would not be entitled to a tax holiday on any upward adjustment made to their transfer prices in the course of an audit

Accountant’s report

It is mandatory for all taxpayers, without exception, to obtain an independent accountant’s report in respect of all international transactions between associated enterprises or specified domestic transactions. The report has to be furnished by the due date of the tax return filing (i.e. on or before 30 November). The form of the report has been prescribed. The report requires the accountant to give an opinion on the proper maintenance of prescribed documents and information by the taxpayer. Furthermore, the accountant is required to certify the correctness of an extensive list of prescribed particulars.

In this context, it is important to note that entities enjoying a tax holiday in India still need to comply with transfer pricing provisions and would need to demonstrate that their international transactions have been carried out at arm’s length. In addition, such entities would not be entitled to a tax holiday on any upward adjustment made to their transfer prices in the course of an audit

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